No Go Home

Dave Hullfish Bailey
Mark Hagen
Alice Könitz
Christopher Michlig
Won Ju Lim
Jim Skuldt
Clard Svenson
The Drop City Film Archive

Curated by Jan Tumlir

September 16 — October 22, 2016

Opening Reception
Friday, September 16th | 7PM - 9PM

View Exhibition Details

<p><span class="name">Drop City</span><br><em>Dome Facet</em><span class='media'>Steel</span>13 x 11 in (33 x 27.9 cm)<br><a class='inquire' href='mailto:info@gildargallery.com?subject=Artwork Inquiry DROP0001&body=I am interested in finding out more about Dome Facet by Drop City'>Inquire</a></p>
<p><span class="name">Dave Bailey</span><br><em>Proposal for an Expansion Zone (downstream) T27S R54W (Picketwire/Corbin/School Section Canyons)</em><span class='media'>Ballpoint pen on archival pigment print</span>20 x 20 in (50.8 x 50.8 cm)<br>2016<br><a class='inquire' href='mailto:info@gildargallery.com?subject=Artwork Inquiry DBAI0004&body=I am interested in finding out more about Proposal for an Expansion Zone (downstream) T27S R54W (Picketwire/Corbin/School Section Canyons) by Dave Bailey'>Inquire</a></p>
<p><span class="name">Dave Bailey</span><br><em>Proposal for an Expansion Zone (downstream) T30S R55W (Picketwire/Plum/School Section Canyons),</em><span class='media'>Ballpoint pen on archival pigment print</span>20 x 20 in (50.8 x 50.8 cm)<br>2016<br><a class='inquire' href='mailto:info@gildargallery.com?subject=Artwork Inquiry DBAI0005&body=I am interested in finding out more about Proposal for an Expansion Zone (downstream) T30S R55W (Picketwire/Plum/School Section Canyons), by Dave Bailey'>Inquire</a></p>
<p><span class="name">Clark Richert</span><br><em>Triad</em><span class='media'>Dayglo on paper</span>22.75 x 22.5 in (57.8 x 57.2 cm)<br>28.25 x 33 in (71.8 x 83.8 cm) (framed)<br>0.196668<br><a class='inquire' href='mailto:info@gildargallery.com?subject=Artwork Inquiry CRIC0033&body=I am interested in finding out more about Triad by Clark Richert'>Inquire</a></p>
<p><span class="name">Clark Richert</span><br><em>Let There Be A Firmament</em><span class='media'>Dayglo on paper</span>16.4 x 16 in (41.6 x 53.3 cm)<br>22 x 26 in (55.9 x 66 cm) (framed)<br>0.196668<br><a class='inquire' href='mailto:info@gildargallery.com?subject=Artwork Inquiry CRIC0034&body=I am interested in finding out more about Let There Be A Firmament by Clark Richert'>Inquire</a></p>
<p><span class="name">Clark Richert</span><br><em>Triadic</em><span class='media'>Dayglo on paper</span>18 3/4 (h) x 21 3/4in (w)<br>0.196668<br><a class='inquire' href='mailto:info@gildargallery.com?subject=Artwork Inquiry CRIC0035&body=I am interested in finding out more about Triadic by Clark Richert'>Inquire</a></p>
<p><span class="name">Clark Richert</span><br><em>Convex-Concave</em><span class='media'>Dayglo on paper</span>edge: 12 3/8", diam. 24 3/4", width 21 1/2" | 25 x 22in (framed)<br>0.196668<br><a class='inquire' href='mailto:info@gildargallery.com?subject=Artwork Inquiry CRIC0036&body=I am interested in finding out more about Convex-Concave by Clark Richert'>Inquire</a></p>
<p><span class="name">Alice Könitz</span><br><em>Sculpture Family (1)</em><span class='media'>metal, print on cardboard | metal, laminate on cardboard, plastic foam | metal, print on cardboard, plastic fitting</span>29 x 12 x 12 cm | 35 x 18 x 18 cm | 21 x 13 x 13 cm<br>2015<br><a class='inquire' href='mailto:info@gildargallery.com?subject=Artwork Inquiry AKON0003&body=I am interested in finding out more about Sculpture Family (1) by Alice Könitz'>Inquire</a></p>
<p><span class="name">Clark Richert</span><br><em>Truncated Octahedron</em><span class='media'>injection molded polyethelene</span>5 x 6.5 x 6.5 in (12.7 x 16.5 x 16.5 cm)<br>1970<br><a class='inquire' href='mailto:info@gildargallery.com?subject=Artwork Inquiry CRIC0038&body=I am interested in finding out more about Truncated Octahedron by Clark Richert'>Inquire</a></p>
<p><span class="name">Clark Richert</span><br><em>Truncated Tetrahedron</em><span class='media'>injection molded polyethelene</span>3.75 x 4.5 x 4.5 in (9.5 x 11.4 x 11.4 cm)<br>1970<br><a class='inquire' href='mailto:info@gildargallery.com?subject=Artwork Inquiry CRIC0039&body=I am interested in finding out more about Truncated Tetrahedron by Clark Richert'>Inquire</a></p>
<p><span class="name">Clark Richert</span><br><em>Cuboctahedron</em><span class='media'>injection molded polyethelene</span>3.75 x 4.5 x 4.5 in (9.5 x 11.4 x 11.4 cm)<br>1970<br><a class='inquire' href='mailto:info@gildargallery.com?subject=Artwork Inquiry CRIC0040&body=I am interested in finding out more about Cuboctahedron by Clark Richert'>Inquire</a></p>
×

Drop City
Dome FacetSteel13 x 11 in (33 x 27.9 cm)
Inquire

×

Dave Bailey
Proposal for an Expansion Zone (downstream) T27S R54W (Picketwire/Corbin/School Section Canyons)Ballpoint pen on archival pigment print20 x 20 in (50.8 x 50.8 cm)
2016
Inquire

×

Dave Bailey
Proposal for an Expansion Zone (downstream) T30S R55W (Picketwire/Plum/School Section Canyons),Ballpoint pen on archival pigment print20 x 20 in (50.8 x 50.8 cm)
2016
Inquire

×

Clark Richert
TriadDayglo on paper22.75 x 22.5 in (57.8 x 57.2 cm)
28.25 x 33 in (71.8 x 83.8 cm) (framed)
0.196668
Inquire

×

Clark Richert
Let There Be A FirmamentDayglo on paper16.4 x 16 in (41.6 x 53.3 cm)
22 x 26 in (55.9 x 66 cm) (framed)
0.196668
Inquire

×

Clark Richert
TriadicDayglo on paper18 3/4 (h) x 21 3/4in (w)
0.196668
Inquire

×

Clark Richert
Convex-ConcaveDayglo on paperedge: 12 3/8", diam. 24 3/4", width 21 1/2" | 25 x 22in (framed)
0.196668
Inquire

×

Alice Könitz
Sculpture Family (1)metal, print on cardboard | metal, laminate on cardboard, plastic foam | metal, print on cardboard, plastic fitting29 x 12 x 12 cm | 35 x 18 x 18 cm | 21 x 13 x 13 cm
2015
Inquire

×

Clark Richert
Truncated Octahedroninjection molded polyethelene5 x 6.5 x 6.5 in (12.7 x 16.5 x 16.5 cm)
1970
Inquire

×

Clark Richert
Truncated Tetrahedroninjection molded polyethelene3.75 x 4.5 x 4.5 in (9.5 x 11.4 x 11.4 cm)
1970
Inquire

×

Clark Richert
Cuboctahedroninjection molded polyethelene3.75 x 4.5 x 4.5 in (9.5 x 11.4 x 11.4 cm)
1970
Inquire

The group exhibition is organized by Los Angeles-based writer Jan Tumlir around the work of Clark Richert, whom the Gildar Gallery represents. Richert, a founding member of the dome-housed commune Drop City in the mid-sixties, once occupied the far-flung epicenter of the radical counterculture. In contrast, the other six artists featured alongside him were born between the years of 1963 and 1976, and therefore would have arrived to the drop-out party at once too early and too late. Their various contributions to the show evidence an attempt to work through this event, a decisive moment at which none were fully present but that is later understood as foundational. This entails a series of movements backward and forward in time, activating the lingering strains of heroic modernity within our postmodern moment across the dividing line of the first “generation gap” to be identified as such.

No Go Home, the title of this exhibition, invokes the call to adventure of the modern barbarian. This is the one who forsakes all tradition, the “destructive character” that Walter Benjamin analyzed in his 1931 essay of the same name. “The destructive character,” he writes, “knows only one watchword: make room. And only one activity: clearing away. His need for fresh air and open space is stronger than any hatred.” This is for Benjamin a “cheerful” enterprise “because everything cleared away means to the destroyer a complete reduction, indeed a rooting out, of his own condition.” The cozy precincts of an overstuffed domesticity are here opposed on principle; for the destructive character, they constitute a no-go zone. But those words of blunt refusal also belong to his much younger and as yet un-socialized counterpart: the child throwing a fit at Disneyland, let’s say. Whereas the utopias of modernism took shape upon the tabula rasa of a negated old world, the ones that follow are increasingly products of consumer choice, an ever-expanding array of pre-set styling options that may be combined in any way we see fit. The youth cultures of the sixties would seem to be antithetical to either end of this equation, but they can also be seen as guiding the transition between them.

The youth cultures of the sixties would seem to be antithetical to either end of this equation, but they can also be seen as guiding the transition between them. In the cultural imaginary, Drop City might now be situated somewhere between the glass house and the magic castle, a functionalist phantasmagoria. Looking back, we can see how sixties ideals of dematerialization, minimal living, anti-capitalism, and nomadism have been factored into our current “design for life.” Once radical proposals oriented toward reducing one’s participation in the economy as a producer and consumer of goods and services are routinely coopted by the “green industries.” Claims of non-ownership or communal ownership are status quo on the Internet. The borderline between work and leisure, and perhaps more significantly between anti-employment and non-compensated labor, grows increasingly vague. The commune finds its new home in the corporate offices of Google and Apple, where the workforce is also encouraged to eat, sleep and play on premises. Global outreach is an indispensible part of maintaining a local profile. Moreover, in regard to both material and informational commodities, the element of bricolage so integral of Drop City is irrefutably asserted: we are all scavengers and recyclers of a readymade world.  

However, this is not to suggest that there is nothing new under the sun. As the counter-cultural initiatives of the hippie vanguard are converted into a range of pragmatic solutions in architecture, product design and communications, attention is drawn toward those aspects of it that remain un-assimilative: parody, travesty, caricature, absurdism. These terms have to be renegotiated from the current perspective, which is post-ideological and/or post-idealistic. The works that comprise this exhibition take leave of the utopian horizon in favor of the heterotopia, an idiosyncratic and carnivalesque upending of the existing “world order.”

 

Selected Works

  • Drop City
    Dome FacetSteel13 x 11 in (33 x 27.9 cm)
    Inquire

  • Dave Bailey
    Proposal for an Expansion Zone (downstream) T27S R54W (Picketwire/Corbin/School Section Canyons)Ballpoint pen on archival pigment print20 x 20 in (50.8 x 50.8 cm)
    2016
    Inquire

  • Dave Bailey
    Proposal for an Expansion Zone (downstream) T30S R55W (Picketwire/Plum/School Section Canyons),Ballpoint pen on archival pigment print20 x 20 in (50.8 x 50.8 cm)
    2016
    Inquire

  • Clark Richert
    TriadDayglo on paper22.75 x 22.5 in (57.8 x 57.2 cm)
    28.25 x 33 in (71.8 x 83.8 cm) (framed)
    0.196668
    Inquire

  • Clark Richert
    Let There Be A FirmamentDayglo on paper16.4 x 16 in (41.6 x 53.3 cm)
    22 x 26 in (55.9 x 66 cm) (framed)
    0.196668
    Inquire

  • Clark Richert
    TriadicDayglo on paper18 3/4 (h) x 21 3/4in (w)
    0.196668
    Inquire

  • Clark Richert
    Convex-ConcaveDayglo on paperedge: 12 3/8", diam. 24 3/4", width 21 1/2" | 25 x 22in (framed)
    0.196668
    Inquire

  • Alice Könitz
    Sculpture Family (1)metal, print on cardboard | metal, laminate on cardboard, plastic foam | metal, print on cardboard, plastic fitting29 x 12 x 12 cm | 35 x 18 x 18 cm | 21 x 13 x 13 cm
    2015
    Inquire

  • Clark Richert
    Truncated Octahedroninjection molded polyethelene5 x 6.5 x 6.5 in (12.7 x 16.5 x 16.5 cm)
    1970
    Inquire

  • Clark Richert
    Truncated Tetrahedroninjection molded polyethelene3.75 x 4.5 x 4.5 in (9.5 x 11.4 x 11.4 cm)
    1970
    Inquire

  • Clark Richert
    Cuboctahedroninjection molded polyethelene3.75 x 4.5 x 4.5 in (9.5 x 11.4 x 11.4 cm)
    1970
    Inquire